following


following
following n Following, clientele, public, audience are comparable when they denote the body of persons who attach themselves to another especially as disciples, patrons, or admirers.
Following is the most comprehensive term, applicable to a group that follows either as a physical train or retinue or as the adherents of a leader, the disciples of a philosopher, the customers of a salesman, the admirers of a young woman, or the fans of an actor
{

such a man, with a great name in the country and a strong following in Parliament— Macaulay

}
{

he unconsciously enrolls a following of like-minded persons— Montague

}
Clientele is chiefly used of the persons, collectively, who go habitually for services to a professional man (as a lawyer or physician) or who give their patronage to a business establishment (as a hotel, a restaurant, or a shop)
{

Dr. Doe has among his clientele all the leading families in the town

}
{

summer hotels usually send out circulars to their clientele in the spring

}
Public basically denotes a group of people with a common interest and may come close to following in many of its applications (as to adherents, disciples, customers, and admirers); often, however, it distinctively conveys the notion of a group making active demands rather than one passively or admiringly following
{

a novelist's public, in fact, is people who read everything he writes even when they hate it— Cary

}
{

a public relations program must be concerned with the policies of the institution, their interpretation and announcement to the college's various publicsBrecht

}
{

protecting movie stars from their publicsNew Yorker

}
{

these two books on Spain are different in purpose, different in scope, and aimed at different publicsBergin

}
Audience is applicable to a following that listens with attention to what a person has to say whenever he addresses them (as in a speech or a book)
{

still govern thou my song, Urania, and fit audience find, though fewMilton

}
{

the stricken poet [Leopardi] . . . had no country, for an Italy in his day did not exist, he had no audience, no celebrity— Arnold

}
Audience, rather than spectators (see SPECTATOR), is also the usual term for designating the body of persons attending a lecture, a play, or a concert on the assumption that they are there primarily to hear, only secondarily to see
{

the audience at the opera packed the house

}

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • following — [adj] happening, being next or after after a while, afterward, attendant, a while later, back, by and by, coming, coming after, coming next, consecutive, consequent, consequential, directly after, ensuing, henceforth, hinder, in pursuit, in… …   New thesaurus

  • following — ► PREPOSITION ▪ coming after or as a result of. ► NOUN ▪ a body of supporters or admirers. ► ADJECTIVE 1) next in time or order. 2) about to be mentioned: the following information …   English terms dictionary

  • Following — Fol low*ing, n. 1. One s followers, adherents, or dependents, collectively. Macaulay. [1913 Webster] 2. Vocation; business; profession. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • following — index ancillary (subsidiary), business (occupation), consequential (deducible), continuous, deductible ( …   Law dictionary

  • following — (n.) c.1300, action of the verb FOLLOW (Cf. follow). Meaning a body of disciples or retainers is from mid 15c …   Etymology dictionary

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